The fruit of kind thoughts

by Oak Hill Studio

It has been a rather quiet week, aside from the nor’easter that brought us our first light snow and more wind–thankfully nothing too extreme. It was a rather enjoyable storm as storms go. I love the sound of the throbbing wind as it gusts through the pine trees  and swirls around the house. I can think of few other settings that are more pleasant to me.  To rest or work within a warm and snug home, a fire crackling in the wood stove,  sets me in a contemplative, creative, and attentive frame of mind.

I have new goals and duties now that everyone is off  following their own courses, and I am finding routines and rhythms that work well for me, keeping me somewhat balanced and on track. With more freedom comes a sense of obligation to spend my time well. I don’t always succeed, as there are so many distractions that vie for my attention–all the more reason to develop good habits derived from daily routines. I think I’ll write more about that next week.

Lately, I have been feeding my thoughts on some excellent writings in a book entitled, The Hidden Power of Kindness by Rev. Lawrence G. Lovasik.  There is so much great meditative food for the mind and soul within these pages–so much so that I realized right off that it would be silly to try to jot down quotes from it into my journal. I’d be practically rewriting the entire book! Each day, I read a small segment and just try to think about what it means and how I might incorporate it into my life. I recently read this:

Genuine love will always feel urged to communicate joy–to be a joy-giver. Mankind needs joy. In our own day, the world is particularly sick because of its joylessness, and all its noisy amusements can neither hide nor drive away its misery. Genuine love always feels impelled to  listen to this hunger of the human soul for love.

It usually costs little to bring joy to another’s heart. All it takes is a little good will, a trifling exertion for the sake of your neighbor, a cheering gift, a few words, and sometimes just a smile.

This passage comes from the chapter entitled, “The Transforming Power of Kind Thoughts.” The opening sentences for the chapter help to shed light on the connection between our thoughts and our actions.

Kind thoughts give power to words and works. Without kind thoughts, there can be no charity. The kind thought is the mold into which charity is cast. The thought eventually takes shape in words and works, giving them their beauty, life, and worth, as in the case of the widow’s mite. The kind thought constitutes the most precious element of even the greatest works of charity.

Honestly, I don’t always think kind thoughts, but I do think, with the help of Christ, it is possible to develop the habit. And to think of all the good fruit that is born of kind thoughts gets me pretty excited. Isn’t it so true that “..the world is particularly sick because of its joylessness, and all its noisy amusements can neither hide nor drive away its misery.” It is sometimes overwhelming to think of all of the trials and difficulties that daily bombard people in the world at large, including those close to me. Yet with a simple act of kindness--“a little good will, a trifling exertion for the sake of your neighbor, a cheering gift, a few words, and sometimes just a smile,” we have the ability to help lighten their load. Even just a little bit might make a big difference for them.

Lately, I’ve been thinking about the power of love, which is really what acts of kindness are, and how showing love can bring light and hope to even the darkest and most difficult situations. It gives deep purpose and meaning to all of life. And what better purpose in life than to be a joy-giver spreading the love and kindness of Christ!

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